Where's Lulu

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Accessible Intercourse 14: Totally TBIs with special guest Cheryl Green

It’s been forever, but we finally got it together enough to sit down and make another Accessible Intercourse video, this time featuring an illustrious co-star: Cheryl Green of the upcoming disability film (and blog) Who Am I To Stop It? 

Cheryl’s also the mastermind behind the inspirational public service announcement that Lulu recently did. Below is part one of two episodes we shot. In it, we goss exclusively about traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), with which Cheryl is personally acquainted. Specifically:

  • What are the biggest social/interpersonal changes that happen after you have a TBI?
  • Does experiencing a TBI make you hyper-sexual?
  • What are the biggest myths surrounding TBIs?

As always: Where’s Lulu takes the irreverent and underappreciated view that disability can be fun(ny). We like to highlight this. Haters can suck it.

Email us a question for the next episode!
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Accessible Intercourse ep. 13: Dating, more dating, and tops vs. bottoms

Back again, with answers to your scorchingest disability questions:

  • When dating online, how much should you reveal about your disability?
  • During sex, are physically disabled people always the ‘bottom’?
  • How do I explain my ‘gross’ disability when I’m on a date?

Where’s Lulu takes the irreverent and underappreciated view that disability can be fun(ny). We like to highlight this. Haters can suck it.

Email us a question for the next episode, and if we use it, we’ll send you an extremely limited edition Where’s Lulu wallet or bag, designed and manufactured by Toshio’s mom, Carolyn!

Background music used in this episode is stuff we cooked up at home:

STONE FOX (a.k.a. Lulu) – COPACETIC

TOSHIO – MUSHROOM AND THE TREE


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Where’s Lulu Swag: Up for Grabs

Send us questions for the next episode of Accessible Intercourse, and if we use your question, we’ll send you a very, very special gift.

These beauts were created by Toshio’s mom, Carolyn, who made them with her own bare hands. Use them to stash stuff such as money, groceries, and the latest Us Weekly.

Don’t delay, email us today.


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Accessible Intercourse 12. Differently abled: embrace it or objectify it?

We’re back with answers to your scorchingest disability questions:

  • Is it better to say ‘disabled’ or ‘differently abled’?
  • How can a parent make their disabled kid feel like they embrace their disability?
  • Is it always wrong for an able-bodied girl to objectify disabled guys?

Where’s Lulu takes the irreverent and underappreciated view that disability can be fun(ny). We like to highlight this. Haters can suck it.

Email us a question for the next episode, and if we use it, we’ll send you an extremely limited edition Where’s Lulu wallet or bag, designed and manufactured by Toshio’s mom, Carolyn!

And BTW, the backing track to this episode is “RSVP” by yours truly.


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Accessible Intercourse 11: Smoking Weed and Popping Cherries

We answer your disability questions: Which disabilities can get you a medical marijuana prescription? Do disability simulation exercises work? Should you hire a sex worker for your virgin brother who has cerebral palsy? Email us with your questions. (NSFW)

Where’s Lulu takes the irreverent and underappreciated view that disability can be fun(ny). We like to highlight this. Haters can suck it.

For the transcript:

Continue reading


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Accessible Intercourse 10: Sex Devices and Cripples Under the Influence

We answer your disability-related sex and relationship questions: How many disabled people are out there? Can you get a DUI on a wheelchair? Is there a market for accessible sex devices? Post your questions here. NSFW

Where’s Lulu takes the irreverent and underappreciated view that disability can be fun(ny). We like to highlight this. Haters can suck it.

For the transcript: Continue reading


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Accessible Intercourse 9: Can paraplegics have sex?

We answer your disability-related sex and relationship questions. This week: 1. deaf people behind the wheel; 2. not using braille signage; 3. sex with feelings.

Post your questions here.

Where’s Lulu takes the irreverent and underappreciated view that disability can be fun(ny). We like to highlight this. Haters can suck it.


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Accessible Intercourse 8: More disabled peeps on TV = better?

We answer your disability-related sex and relationship questions. This week: 1. puppies you shouldn’t pet; 2. talking about disabled students behind their backs; 3. more representation on TV = more better?

Post your questions here.

Where’s Lulu takes the irreverent and underappreciated view that disability can be fun(ny). We like to highlight this. Haters can suck it.

PS. The TV show we reference is actually called California Dreams, not California Dreamin’. And here are the amazing opening credits, featuring Toshio’s Asian sister doing it for herself, the inimitable Jennie Kwan.

TRANSCRIPT:

Toshio: A blind lady yelled at me for petting her guide dog. Was I wrong?

Caitlin: You’re not supposed to pet the doggies, while they’re working.

T: Even if they’re really cute?

C: Even if they’ve got like a sweater on, or a scarf, or they’re dressed up like a fireman, or a sexy nurse…

T: Oh, that’s so cute – I’m getting this image in my head right now…

C: Yeah. Or at least ask to pet the dogs.

T: So basically, they’re working. They’re working is-

C: They’re working-

T: Is the deal.

C: And you could distract them. That’s why you’re not supposed to pet them.

T: OK, OK.

T: We have kind of a long one, I’m going to read off the screen, so maybe you can check out my pores for a second. I am a teacher with a physically disabled student. When managing the class as a whole is it best to downplay his disability and include him in activities in the same way as anyone else, or to confront it head on, finding the most meaningful and unique ways to include him in each activity, even if it means him doing things differently.

C: I see, that’s a really fantastic question. I’m a huge fan – as are you – of universal design, where everyone is included equally, and it’s egalitarian, and it’s not making someone quote-unquote special. While I think his disability, or disabilities, present some unique unique opportunities, and unique gifts and skills that he could offer the class – I think – I don’t know what grade you’re talking about-

T: Tenth.

C: Tenth grade? Oh, god. So, high school, especially, I would say downplay, downplay, downplay, just because you don’t know. But make it positive and just talk to your student confidentially, and ask them what their comfort level is. From personal experience, uh, when I was in junior high school, my teachers, like, talked to the class when I wasn’t there-

T: Oh really.

C: Like in front of the entire class, and I found out about it later from a friend, and was horribly humiliated. So I would say don’t do that.

T: OK.

T: Would having more differently abled bodies on TV make things better?

C: Yeah, I think it would be great, to have more disabled people. When you’re not, uh, seeing anyone who looks like you in media, it can feel like you’re invisible.

T: Well, I know, yeah, when I was growing up and I was Asian, and-

C: Gay…

T: – homo, you know, it’s like, I wanted something, any representation whatsoever, even if it was, you know, kind of stereotypical. So-

C: Something.

T: – there was this show called California Dreamin’.

C: It was off of Saved By The Bell.

T: It was awful, but there was an Asian chick, and she was the lead singer in this band-

C: Mmhmm.

T: -and I was like, oh, like I could actually do that, and I went on, you know, to be in this amazing band-

C: Yeah you did.

T: With you.

C: Yeah you did.

T: So I think if it hadn’t been for-

C: California Dreamin’-

T: California Dreamin’-

C: You wouldn’t even be here.

T: All press is good press.

C: All disabled people are good disabled people. I’m – I think visibility is extremely important – I can’t really name many disabled women that I look to as role models, which is sad.


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Accessible Intercourse 7: Why is my bus full of cripples?

We answer your disability-related sex and relationship questions. This week: blind people: they’re just like us!; 2. stooping to the level of people in wheelchairs; 3. how disabled people get around. Post your questions here.

Where’s Lulu takes the irreverent and underappreciated view that disability can be fun(ny). We like to highlight this. Haters can suck it.


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Accessible Intercourse 6: Is obesity a disability?

We answer your disability-related sex and relationship questions. This week: 1. visible vs. invisible disabilities; 2. why Jerry Lewis isn’t funny; 3. the skinny on fat discrimination. Post your questions here.

Per this blog post, you can now view Accessible Intercourse with captions on YouTube. They’re still working out the kinks, so the timing’s off (if you can’t stand it, the transcript’s below), but you can check ‘em out by clicking the triangle icon in the lower right of the YouTube window, and highlighting the “CC” icon.

TRANSCRIPT

Toshio: Are all disabled people oppressed equally?

Caitlin: No. No.

T: No.

C: Um -

T: Some disabilities you can completely get away with not showing them.

C: Exactly

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